The Private Sector’s Doing Fine? It’s Time To Smack Down Government Unions And Their Useful Idiot Obama Once And For All

One of the facts of history is that even Franklin Delano Roosevelt believed that government unions was un-American and inherently dangerous (see here and also here).  FDR pointed out the fact that for a government employee, “the employer was the whole people” and described strikes by public union workers – which have happened many, many times, for what it’s worth – as something that:

“manifests nothing less than an intent on their part to prevent or obstruct the operations of Government until their demands are satisfied. Such action, looking toward the paralysis of Government by those who have sworn to support it, is unthinkable and intolerable.”

It is a morbid, not to mention sick and twisted, fact that public unions now own the Democrat Party.  Big union money represents more than TEN TIMES any Republican Party special interest money.

Obama’s utterly asinine statement that “the public sector’s doing fine” was an inherent plea for the American people to sacrifice themselves, their families and their economic interests in order to make government and the government unions that are in bed with the Democrat Party bigger.

The reality is that the private sector labor force has massively shrank to its lowest rate in more than thirty-one years under the failed policies of Barack Obama.  And even worse, as that article documents, the numbers keep moving IN THE WRONG DIRECTION.  Obama’s “improved” unemployment rate is a load of bunk: the only reason the rate has decreased is because the millions who drop out of the labor force are no longer counted.  The fact is that 88 MILLION working age Americans are idly sitting on their asses under Obama’s absolute failure as president.

As another real-term measure of how frankly evil Obama’s assertion that “the private sector’s doing fine,” the median wage – which Obama demonized George Bush’s presidency for a $2,000 decline over eight years – has declined a shocking $4,300 since Obama took office.  Which is to say that Obama is actually well over four times as much a failure as the president he has made his entire presidency about demonizing.

“Doing fine” my ass.

But let’s get back to the other side of the equation, the public unions, that Obama wants you to help pave right over your own grave.

Public unions have been a mistake that have been “progressively” poisoning America for the last 50 years.  It is long past time to correct that mistake – with an axe:

The End Nears for a 50-Year Mistake
Jeff Jacoby
Jun 10, 2012

In retrospect, there were two conspicuous giveaways that Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker was headed for victory in last week’s recall election.

One was that the Democrats’ campaign against him wound up focusing on just about everything but Walker’s law limiting collective bargaining rights for government workers. Sixteen months ago, the Capitol building in Madison was besieged by rioting protesters hell-bent on blocking the changes by any means necessary. Union members and their supporters, incandescent with rage, likened Walker to Adolf Hitler and cheered as Democratic lawmakers fled the state in a bid to force the legislature to a standstill. Once the bill passed, unions and Democrats vowed revenge, and amassed a million signatures on recall petitions.

But the more voters saw of the law’s effects, the more they liked it. Dozens of school districts reported millions in savings, most without resorting to layoffs. Property taxes fell. A $3.6 billion state budget deficit turned into a $154 million projected surplus. Walker’s measures proved a tonic for the economy, and support for restoring the status quo ante faded — even among Wisconsin Democrats. Long before Election Day, Democratic challenger Tom Barrett had all but dropped the issue of public-sector collective bargaining from his campaign to replace Walker.

The second harbinger was the plunge in public-employee union membership. The most important of Walker’s reforms, the change Big Labor had fought most bitterly, was ending the automatic withholding of union dues. That made union membership a matter of choice, not compulsion — and tens of thousands of government workers chose to toss their union cards. More than one-third of the American Federation of Teachers Wisconsin membership quit, reported The Wall Street Journal. At the American Federation of State, County, and Municipal Employees, one of the state’s largest unions, the hemorrhaging was worse: AFSCME’s Wisconsin rolls shrank by more than 34,000 over the past year, a 55 percent nose-dive.

Did government workers tear up their union cards solely because the union had lost its right to bargain collectively on their behalf? That’s doubtful: Even under the new law, unions still negotiate over salaries. More likely, public-sector employees ditched their unions for the same reasons so many employees in the private sector — which is now less than 7 percent unionized — have done so. Many never wanted to join a union in the first place. Others were repelled by the authoritarian, belligerent, and left-wing political culture that entrenched unionism so often embodies.

Even before the votes in Wisconsin were cast, observed Michael Barone last week, Democrats and public-employee unions “had already lost the battle of ideas over the issue that sparked the recall.” Their tantrums and slanders didn’t just fail to intimidate Walker and Wisconsin lawmakers from reining in public-sector collective bargaining. They also gave the public a good hard look at what government unionism is apt to descend to. The past 16 months amounted to an extended seminar on the danger of combining collective bargaining with government jobs. Voters watched — and learned.

There was a time when pro-labor political leaders like Franklin D. Roosevelt and Fiorello LaGuardia regarded it as obvious that collective bargaining was incompatible with public employment. Even the legendary AFL-CIO leader George Meany once took it for granted that there could be no “right” to bargain collectively with the government.

When unions bargain with management in the private sector, both sides are contending for a share of the private profits that labor helps produce — and both sides are constrained by the pressures of market discipline. Managers can’t ignore the company’s bottom line. Unions know that if they demand too much they may cost the company its competitive edge.

But when labor and management bargain in the public sector, they are divvying up public funds, not private profits. Government bureaucrats don’t have to worry about losing business to their competitors; state agencies can’t relocate to another part of the country. There is little incentive to hold down wages and benefits, since the taxpayers who will be picking up the tab have no seat at the table. On the other hand, government managers have a powerful motivation to yield to government unions: Union members vote, and their votes can be deployed to reward politicians who give them what they want — or punish those who don’t.

In 1959, when Wisconsin became the first state to enact a public-sector collective-bargaining law, it wasn’t widely understood what the distorted incentives of government unionism would lead to. Five decades later, the wreckage is all around us. The privileges that come with government work — hefty automatic pay raises, Cadillac pension plans, iron-clad job security, ultra-deluxe health insurance — have in many cases grown outlandish and staggeringly unaffordable. What Keith Geiger, the former head of the National Education Association, once referred to as “our sledgehammer, the collective bargaining process,” has wreaked havoc on state and municipal budgets nationwide.

Now, at long last, the pendulum has reversed. The 50-year mistake of public-sector unions is being corrected. Walker’s victory is a heartening reminder that in a democracy, even the most entrenched bad ideas can sometimes be unentrenched. On, Wisconsin!

It wasn’t just Wisconsin, which voted for Obama by a fifteen point margin, that is rejecting Obama’s demand to increase government and government unions.  It turns out that San Diego and San Jose similarly utterly and overwhelmingly rejected the morally evil demands of public sector union “workers.”  It’s facts like this that made even these historically liberal cities reject the government union label:

San Jose firefighters were able to retire at the age of 48 with 90 percent of their salaries as pension.  And after seventy percent of the residents of San Jose voted to end that pork, they are suing to use rat bastard judges to force the people to keep bankrupting themselves to pay those benefits.  Given that the people who pay their salaries and benefits get nothing anywhere near that, it is immoral.

California alone has an unfunded pension liability of $500 BILLION.  There is absolutely no way in hell the taxpayers can pay the bill that morally evil labor unions want to force the private sector that is “doing fine” to pay. 

What Barack Obama wants is immoral.

Fire him in November.

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4 Responses to “The Private Sector’s Doing Fine? It’s Time To Smack Down Government Unions And Their Useful Idiot Obama Once And For All”

  1. Steven Says:

    Thanks for the link! What’s funny is that Obama was put into office in part by all the help the unions gave him in 2008. He’s since stabbed them in the back by not campaigning against Walker in Wisconsin.

  2. Michael Eden Says:

    Obama is a malignant narcissist who really, truly loves Obama.

    Everybody who doesn’t help him politically is a racist and a blasphemer on his view of the world.

    Besides Obama waved at the clouds over Wisconsin as he flew over the state just before the election on his way to a fundraiser. He even tweeted. What more can liberals possibly expect from their messiah?

  3. Jose Rodriguez Says:

    San Jose Firefighters can’t retire at 48.

  4. Michael Eden Says:

    Jose Rodriguez,

    From Bloomberg:

    A 2007 arbitration ruling letting San Jose, California, firefighters retire as early as age 48 with 90 percent of their pay may result in the firing of 370 municipal workers as the 10th-largest U.S. city tries to close a budget deficit fueled by higher pension costs.

    Not any more they can’t, thank God.

    Mind you, that’s only because people like me outvoted people like you.

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