14 Wisconsin Democrat Deserters: ‘Jobs? We Don’t Need No Stinking Jobs!’

“I don’t think it does anybody any good when public employees are denigrated or vilified or their rights are infringed upon,” said totally-in-da-pocket-of-da-unions Barry Hussein.

Okay, so it’s bad to denigrate or vilify public employees.

Except the governor of the state, who is a public employee whom the public UNION employees have damned as Adolf Hitler and as a Nazi.  Barry could care less about vilifying the governor as Hitler.  Because if he had one more particle of hypocrite inside of him it would explode right out of his thin skin.

Barry Hussein’s on the side of chief AFL-CIO thug Richard Trumka, you see.  And since Scott Walker is a public employee who ISN’T in the union’s pocket, it’s FINE to tee off on him in the most hateful way imaginable:

Union Chief Doesn’t Condemn Comparisons of Wisconsin’s Walker to Hitler
Published February 27, 2011
| FoxNews.com

Fox News Channel

The head of one of the nation’s most powerful labor unions did not condemn the violent rhetoric in placards and signs held by union supporters demonstrating in Wisconsin despite two direct attempts Sunday to get him on the record declaring them inappropriate.

On several occasions over the past two weeks of demonstrations in the Wisconsin capital of Madison news media have zeroed in on signs that liken Republican Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker to Nazi leader Adolf Hitler and recently ousted Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak

Appearing Sunday on NBC’s “Meet the Press,” AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka was twice asked whether he found the tone at the nearly two-week long demonstrations “wrong” or “inappropriate.”

Trumka did not answer […]

Apparently it is PERFECTLY okay to denigrate public employees.  At least by Barry Hussein’s twisted standards.  That’s the way scumbags like Trumka and Obama roll.

That’s one lie from Barry Hussein.  Another one is that he gives a damn about jobs.  Because his rigid union ideology is about to cost at least a thousand of them tomorrow:

Governor gives Wisconsin Democrats an ultimatum
By David Bailey

MADISON, Wisc. | Mon Feb 28, 2011 5:41pm EST

MADISON, Wisc. (Reuters) – Republican Gov. Scott Walker on Monday gave absent Democratic lawmakers an ultimatum to return to Wisconsin within 24 hours and vote on a proposal to reduce the power of public sector unions or the state would miss out on a debt restructuring.

Walker stepped up the pressure on 14 Senate Democrats who fled the state to avoid a vote on the bill as he prepared to unveil on Tuesday a two-year state budget that he said cuts $1 billion from funding to local governments and schools.

What began as one small state trying to rewrite the rules of labor relations has blown up into what could be the biggest confrontation with American labor unions since then President Ronald Reagan fired striking air traffic controllers in 1981.

For the second time since the controversy erupted, President Barack Obama weighed into the debate on Monday criticizing the Wisconsin plan without mentioning it by name.

“I don’t think it does anybody any good when public employees are denigrated or vilified or their rights are infringed upon,” Obama told the nation’s governors gathered in Washington.

Wisconsin’s Walker immediately issued a response, saying: “I’m sure that President Obama simply misunderstands the issues in Wisconsin.”

Pro-union demonstrators continued to occupy the State Capitol building on Monday after some of them refused to leave on Sunday night. Capitol police, who had allowed the protesters to stay in the building for more than a week, on Monday prevented more from entering even though it was a week day.

So far the police have been tolerant of the protesters and no arrests have been made.

Walker’s budget proposal brought out the biggest protest crowd since the Vietnam War in Madison over the weekend.

A new poll released on Monday suggested that if the 2010 election could be replayed the Wisconsin governor might lose. The Public Policy Polling survey found that if the election were repeated the result would flip with Walker’s Democratic opponent Tom Barrett getting 52 percent and Walker 45 percent. Walker won with 52 percent in November. The shift came mainly from union households.

The Wisconsin proposal would require public sector employees to pay more for pensions and health care, strip some of their unions of bargaining rights except for wages up to the rate of inflation and require yearly recertification votes.

The proposal was approved by the state Assembly last week but is stalled in the Senate because the 14 Democrats have fled the state to avoid a vote.

The proposal includes a restructuring of the state’s debt that Walker said would save $165 million. Walker said this restructuring deal was in doubt if the Democrats did not return.

“Failure to return to work and cast their votes will lead to more painful and aggressive spending cuts in the very near future,” Walker’s said in a statement.

Under Walker’s proposal, Wisconsin’s general obligation bonds would be restructured and that would push debt service payments due by March 15 into future years.

Democrats differed from Walker’s estimate, quoting on Monday a report from state fiscal analyst Al Runde saying that the restructuring Walker wants would add more than $42 million of interest payments over the long term.

In an interview broadcast on Sunday, Walker said he hoped to delay sending layoff notices to state workers if the legislature makes progress on fixing the budget deficit, according to website wispolitics.com.

But to postpone the layoffs, Walker said it will be necessary that his budget repair bill, including the move to end collective bargaining, go into effect by April 1.

There has been speculation that Walker would send out layoff notices to more than 1,000 state workers if no progress was made soon on the budget.

(Additional reporting by Stefanie Carano in Madison and Wendell Marsh in Washington; Editing by Greg McCune)

For what it’s worth, “Public Policy Polling” is rather like asking what Media Matters thinks about something.  It is very left leaning with Democrat connections.  Try most accurate Rasmussen and you get a dramatically different result.

I mean, everyone I talked to says Walker is right-on.  And the fact that I only talked to Republicans really doesn’t have anything to do with anything.

The most important thing for the moment is tomorrow’s deadline for Democrats to return.  We can take the first two and last two sentences of the Reuters article to cut to the chase:

MADISON, Wisc. (Reuters) – Republican Gov. Scott Walker on Monday gave absent Democratic lawmakers an ultimatum to return to Wisconsin within 24 hours and vote on a proposal to reduce the power of public sector unions or the state would miss out on a debt restructuring.

Walker stepped up the pressure on 14 Senate Democrats who fled the state to avoid a vote on the bill as he prepared to unveil on Tuesday a two-year state budget that he said cuts $1 billion from funding to local governments and schools. […]

But to postpone the layoffs, Walker said it will be necessary that his budget repair bill, including the move to end collective bargaining, go into effect by April 1.

There has been speculation that Walker would send out layoff notices to more than 1,000 state workers if no progress was made soon on the budget.

The fact of the matter is that Walker may have to end up laying off 6,000 workers, not just 1,000:

Wisconsin is broke. The current budget is already $137 million in the red. The 2011–2013 biennial budget faces a $3.6 billion hole. So Governor Walker has called the legislature into special session and presented them with an emergency budget. His plan closes the deficit without raising taxes.

Government employees in Wisconsin get amazing benefits. They get a generous defined-benefit pension with minimal contributions on their part. They also only pay 6 percent of the cost of their health-care premiums. Few taxpayers enjoy anything this generous.

Government employees get these benefits because of the special privileges government unions enjoy. Government workers in many states — including Wisconsin — must pay union dues or lose their jobs. The state subsidizes their fundraising by using its payroll system to collect these forced dues.

This gives the union movement billions of dollars, which it uses to elect favored candidates. The American Federation of State and County Municipal Employees (AFSCME) spent more than any other outside group in the last election. Government unions have used this political clout to hijack state government to serve their interests.

Governor Walker could have raised taxes or fired 6,000 state employees. Instead, like Governor Christie, he decided to actually fix the problems that brought Wisconsin to this point. His budget limits government collective bargaining to just wages, taking benefits and work rules off the bargaining table. He would also require voters to approve any raises above inflation. Walker would prevent government unions from forcing taxpayers to cough up for their gold-plated benefits.

Democrats don’t give a damn about creating jobs.  They only care about UNION jobs. 

And it looks like tomorrow they’ll prove it.

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