Posts Tagged ‘Interpol’

Obama Exalts Foreign Agencies While Criminalizing American Ones

January 11, 2010

Another play from Obama’s plan to “fundamentally transform America.”

Obama gives Interpol free hand in U.S.
Examiner Editorial
December 30, 2009

No presidential statement or White House press briefing was held on it. In fact, all that can be found about it on the official White House Web site is the Dec. 17 announcement and one-paragraph text of President Obama’s Executive Order 12425, with this innocuous headline: “Amending Executive Order 12425 Designating Interpol as a public international organization entitled to enjoy certain privileges, exemptions, and immunities.” In fact, this new directive from Obama may be the most destructive blow ever struck against American constitutional civil liberties. No wonder the White House said as little as possible about it.

There are multiple reasons why this Obama decision is so deeply disturbing. First, the Obama order reverses a 1983 Reagan administration decision in order to grant Interpol, the International Criminal Police Organization, two key privileges. First, Obama has granted Interpol the ability to operate within the territorial limits of the United States without being subject to the same constitutional restraints that apply to all domestic law enforcement agencies such as the FBI. Second, Obama has exempted Interpol’s domestic facilities — including its office within the U.S. Department of Justice — from search and seizure by U.S. authorities and from disclosure of archived documents in response to Freedom of Information Act requests filed by U.S. citizens. Think very carefully about what you just read: Obama has given an international law enforcement organization that is accountable to no other national authority the ability to operate as it pleases within our own borders, and he has freed it from the most basic measure of official transparency and accountability, the FOIA.

The Examiner has asked for but not yet received from the White House press office an explanation of why the president signed this executive order and who among his advisers was involved in the process leading to his doing so. Unless the White House can provide credible reasons to think otherwise, it seems clear that Executive Order 12425’s consequences could be far-reaching and disastrous. To cite only the most obvious example, giving Interpol free rein to act within this country could subject U.S. military, diplomatic, and intelligence personnel to the prospect of being taken into custody and hauled before the International Criminal Court as “war criminals.”

As National Review Online’s Andy McCarthy put it, the White House must answer these questions: Why should we elevate an international police force above American law? Why would we immunize an international police force from the limitations that constrain the FBI and other American law-enforcement agencies? Why is it suddenly necessary to have, within the Justice Department, a repository for stashing government files that will be beyond the scrutiny of Congress, American law enforcement, the media, and the American people?

As a note of clarity, I supplied the link to McCarthy’s National Review article.

A few months ago, Obama was not only demonizing the CIA, but openly threatening to criminalize it over its role in the Bush White House’s policy of enhanced interrogations.

The left showed their true colors in almost immediately demonizing and attacking the CIA.

A Newseek article had this to say about the angry, bitter, defensive mentality of the CIA following Obama’s attacks:

[T]he CIA better change their mission to “CYA,” because our government is not going to stand behind you.”

Those concerns were echoed by a retired undercover operative who still works under contract for the agency (and asked to remain anonymous when discussing internal agency politics). Clandestine Service officers are both demoralized and angry at Obama’s decisions to release the memos and ban future agency use of aggressive interrogation tactics, the former operative said. “It embarrasses our families. You just can’t keep hitting us. Sooner or later we’re going to stop going out and working.” The official added that “a lot of offense was taken” among some Clandestine Service veterans when Obama declared that the interrogation practices the agency employed under Bush were wrong, even though the new Administration would not prosecute operatives for carrying them out.

An AtlasShrugs article described the morale of the CIA following Obama’s demonization crusade as “depressed, sullen, and enraged.”

And you wonder why Newsmax back on April 27 of last year said that Obama had paralyzed the CIA.

Obama now has a system in which we treat Seals like terrorists and terrorists like citizens.  Which means our most important military assets are now paralyzed, too.

But not Interpol.  Oh, no.  They’re an empowered bunch.  And as a matter of fact, they are going to now have a free hand launching secret investigations against the few CIA, FBI and military personnel who would “overly aggressively” pursue those nice terrorists who only attack us because we’re so evil.

A Pajama’s Media article serves to demonstrate why this move by Obama is yet another reason that Israel should know that Obama couldn’t care less about them.

Interpol is on the verge of becoming the United Nation’s supercop, to investigate and criminalize any who might stand in the way of the UN’s radically politically correct socialist-redistributionist agenda.  And Obama wants to help them succeed in that role by giving them a free hand in the United States.