Posts Tagged ‘politically correct’

Disturbing Modern Trend Portends Something From The Bible

November 18, 2010

This was amazing.  And it’s happening more and more these days:

Wed Nov 17, 2:10 pm ET
If the Science Guy passes out and nobody tweets it, did it happen?
By Brett Michael Dykes

Last night in front of an audience of hundreds at a presentation at the University of Southern California, TV personality Bill Nye — popularly known as the “Science Guy” — collapsed midsentence as he walked toward a podium. Early indications are that Nye is OK, but what’s odd about the incident isn’t so much Nye’s  slight health setback as the crowd’s reaction. Or, more precisely, its nonreaction, according to several accounts.

It appears that the students in attendance, rather than getting up from their seats to rush to Nye’s aid, instead pulled out their mobile devices to post information about Nye’s loss of consciousness.

Alastair Fairbanks, a USC senior in attendance for Nye’s presentation, told the Los Angeles Times that “nobody went to his aid at the very beginning when he first collapsed — that just perplexed me beyond reason.” The student added, “Instead, I saw students texting and updating their Twitter statuses. It was just all a very bizarre evening.”

[Rewind: Joe Biden’s quick response to onstage fainting]

Indeed, a cursory search on Twitter revealed a virtual play-by-play account of the incident. One student wrote, “Bill Nye tripped on his computer cord while speaking at USC, was out for abt 5 secs, got back up, spoke w/ slurred speech and fainted.”

According to the school’s student news outlet, the Daily Trojan, Nye asked, “What happened? How long was I out?” when he regained consciousness. Briskly picking up his humorous persona, he added, “Wow, that was crazy. I feel like Lady Gaga or something.” Nye’s publicity team didn’t immediately respond to The Lookout’s request for comment on the episode.

[Rewind: NBA coach faints at practice]

Still, in the annals of the digital public’s civic indifference, the Nye incident is nowhere near as disturbing as another episode reported in New Orleans earlier this week, which oddly enough also involved a humorist. Anthony Barre, a New Orleans man popular for his acid-tongued comic performances on YouTube using the handle “Messy Mya,” was murdered on the streets of the city’s 7th Ward — the historically Creole neighborhood chronicled in the HBO series “Treme.” As he lay dying, witnesses at the scene took to the Internet to chronicle the tragedy in real time, even posting photos of his body lying in a pool of blood.

Here’s how the Times-Picayune’s Brendan McCarthy described the incident:

Moments after gunshots roared through the 7th Ward on Sunday night, a lone snapshot appeared on the Internet.

In it, a 22-year-old man is lying cheek to the ground, crimson pooling around his neck. His eyes are closed, his torso curled.

Chaos explodes around him, with the arms of others pressed to the back of his head. And someone is holding a cell phone just inches from his face.

This is how the world learned of Messy Mya’s death.

Prior to this week’s episodes, perhaps the best-known incident of youthful digital passivity in the face of danger was the September 2007 tasing of University of Florida student Andrew Meyer at a speech delivered by Massachusetts Democratic Sen. John Kerry. That episode immortalized the expression “Don’t tase me, bro!” The crowd of onlookers trying to capture the encounter on their cellphone cameras later prompted Comedy Central host Stephen Colbert to imagine the internal monologue of a bored-looking kid seated next to Meyer thusly: “He’s thinking, ‘I wish they’d stop tasing this guy, so I can get home and watch him being tased on YouTube.’ “

There’s a line of dialogue I remember from a movie called “Wild Bill” as the two characters entered a sleazy town:

Charley Price: This town reminds me of something from the Bible.
James Butler ‘Wild Bill’ Hickok: Which part?
Charley Price: The part right before god gets angry.

And here’s a “part” of the Bible this incident reminds me of:

“But realize this, that in the last days difficult times will come.  For men will be lovers of self, lovers of money, boastful, arrogant, revilers, disobedient to parents, ungrateful, unholy, unloving, irreconcilable, malicious gossips, without self-control, brutal, haters of good, treacherous, reckless, conceited, lovers of pleasure rather than lovers of God, holding to a form of godliness, although they have denied its power; Avoid such men as these” (Saint Paul, in 2 Timothy 3:1-5).

And dang, doesn’t texting and tweeting and video cameras ever bring to life the “malicious gossips” section of this prophetic passage?

I can’t even imagine a man collapsing in front of me and not rushing over to try to help him.  So imagine how unimaginable it must be for me to imagine a huge crowd of people texting and twittering while a man falls down and lies unconscious on a stage.

A week ago I had a VA (Veterans Administration) appointment.  A man in a wheelchair was trying to get through a door that shut on him.  Ten of us immediately got up from our seats to help him.

But that was a far, FAR better generation than “the last days” group we’ve got now.  It makes me nauseous to think about these effete, sanctimonious, sycophantic, self-righteous snobs.

These are the punks who voted for Obama in such huge numbers in 2008.  They’re the ones who lecture us about the environment and taxes and gay marriage and abortion and illegal immigration and ObamaCare and big government and all the other politically correct crap.

Al Gore recently was caught on tape talking to such an audience of texters and tweeters:

On the tape, Gore states: “When I was your age and the civil rights revolution was unfolding, and we kids asked our parents and their generation, ‘Explain to me again why it’s okay for the law to officially discriminate against people because of their skin color?’

“And when our parents’ generation couldn’t answer that question, that’s when the law started to change. There are some things about our world that you know that older people don’t know,” he continued.

“Why would that be? Well in a period of rapid change, the old assumptions sometimes just don’t work anymore because they’re out of date,” Gore said.

For the record, Al Gore didn’t invent treating black people like human beings any more than he invented the internet.  There were people who fought a bitter Civil War nearly 150 years ago to bring that about.  They were called “Republicans.”  And the people they fought were called “Democrats.”

And the only reason “the old assumptions” are “out of date” these days is because demonic rat bastard moralizing panderers like Al Gore have become the teachers of this terminal generation.  And the same people who constantly congratulate themselves on just how wonderful they are don’t even deserve to be called “pathetic.”

Media Hypes Obama’s Giving $12 Billion To Small Businesses, Ignores Fact That He TAKES $300 Billion Away

September 6, 2010

First, a typical mainstream media dose of pure horsecrap from the AP:

Republicans block small business lending bill
By STEPHEN OHLEMACHER; Associated Press Writer
Published: 07/29/10 2:13 pm | Updated: 07/29/10 4:14 pm

WASHINGTON – President Barack Obama’s election-year jobs agenda suffered a new setback Thursday when Senate Republicans blocked a bill creating a $30 billion government fund to help open up lending for credit-starved small businesses.

The fund would be available to community banks with less than $10 billion in assets to help them increase lending to small businesses. The bill would combine the fund with about $12 billion in tax breaks aimed at small businesses.

Democrats say banks should be able to use the lending fund to leverage up to $300 billion in loans, helping to loosen tight credit markets. Some Republicans, however, likened it to the unpopular bailout of the financial industry.

Democrats had wanted to pass the bill before Congress leaves town for summer vacation, but that won’t happen with the House scheduled to adjourn Friday. The Senate is in session for another week, but Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid said there would be no more votes until Monday.

And whose to blame for this despicable refusal to help small businesses, you ask?  Republicans, out to cynically manipulate the issue and undermine the economy in order to score cheap political points for the November election.

How dare they?  What kind of minions on evil are these Republicans?

Do the Republicans have a reason for their evilness?  Not really.  All they have, according to the Associated Press, is an ad hominem comparison to the financial bailout.

The only problem is, day in and day out, the mainstream media only gives the part of the story that contributes to its ideological agenda.

The Wall Street Journal manages to find the reasoning behind the Republican position that the Associated Press simply didn’t think you to know:

The bill authorizes Treasury to purchase up to $30 billion of stock in small, community banks across the country. The banks in turn would agree to issue as much as $300 billion in loans to small businesses that they wouldn’t otherwise lend to. You can bet that many businesses that get the loans will be engaged in not very profitable, but politically correct activities, such as diversity investing and renewable energy. Sound at all like subprime mortgage loans?

Here’s the best part: The whiz kids at the Congressional Budget Office and Joint Committee on Taxation estimate that this program will raise $1.1 billion for the federal government. So there really is a free lunch.

The assumption is that these banks will make such wise loans that they’ll make a bundle and the Treasury will get its money back in dividends on its preferred stock. But then why not have Treasury invest $100 billion to leverage $1 trillion in new loans? Or why not $2 trillion? If government-directed investment and lending can conjure such returns, the deficit should vanish in no time.

The false assumption here is that banks are reluctant to lend because they lack the capital. This ignores that small business lending is also down because the business demand for loans is weak. Businesses don’t typically expand when Washington is raising dividend, capital gains and personal income tax rates while piling on the new costs of ObamaCare and other regulations.

The tax cut in this bill will provide $12 billion in relief over 10 years. The tax increase that Mr. Obama favors for 2011 would raise what the Joint Committee on Taxation figures will be $600 billion of revenues, about half of which comes from the coffers of small business. So the tax hikes, which are permanent, are about 50 times larger than the tax cuts, which are temporary. And the Obama Administration wonders why some people think this President is antibusiness.

The title of that WSJ article is “Son of Tarp.”  As in, the evil child of the evil and justifiably unpopular financial bailout.

So, yeah, Republicans liken this bill to the financial bailout.  Because it pursues the exact same rationale that the financial bailout followed.  Because it does the exact same things.  And because it will lead to the exact same result.

But it wasn’t important for you to know why the Republicans might be right.  All you needed to know, in the minds of the Associated Press, is that Obama and the Democrats are the party bringing “change,” “change” is clearly good (including, apparently, such “change” as shoving a nuclear bomb into your ear and then detonating it), and Republicans are cynically blocking “change.”

The biggest bottom line of all is the bottom line of the WSJ piece.  The mainstream media wants to shout from the rooftops that Obama is giving $12 billion to help small businesses.  But when they ought to be pointing out that Obama is actually taking away $300 billion from small businesses in the form of the giant tax increase when Obamacrats allow the tax cuts “for the rich” to expire, all you can hear is crickets chirping.

Obama is going to take fifty times more from small businesses in permanent taxes than he’s going to give them in temporary relief.  And the mainstream propaganda is treating this rape of businesses like its some kind of gift from heaven.

That’s just the way the rodent media rolls.

Warning! A Few Things You Should Know Before Getting A Puppy From A Shelter

July 10, 2010

I’ve bought three dogs in my life prior to the one I recently brought home from a shelter – and all three came from backyard breeders.

The first two were Rottweiler/German Shepherd mix brothers (from the same litter) that were sired by the 3/4 Rott 1/4 German Shepherd dog from next door who beat the purebred Rott to the party.  The third was a purebread Rott.

The two mixes were as healthy as could be.  The purebread Rott had an umbilical hernia – for which the breeder took full financial responsibility.

No other health issues.

The two brothers were housetrained in five days.  The purebred Rott was housetrained in a long (albeit very long!!!) July 4th weekend.

Furthermore, I had a pretty good idea what I was getting when I got my backyard-bred pups.  I was able to see both parents (although in the case of the two mix brothers, I had to look over the fence to see the daddy).

And they were healthy.  The two Rott/Shepherd mixes used to go with me on three-day backpacking trips in the Willamette National Forest.  I would hike 12-14 miles a day, while the dogs chased each other through the trees.  They would EASILY run over 300 miles in those three days.  That’s healthy.

Now let me compare that to my little shelter baby.

First of all, you don’t get a whole lot of an idea what kind of a dog you’re getting, what breed it is, or how big it will likely be, if you get a puppy from a city/county shelter.  That may not matter to you.  But if it does, be aware.

In my own case, I got a “hound mix” puppy.  What’s a hound mix?  There are 23 breeds under the category “hound.”  Moreover, the card said she was 2 months old.  But what does that mean?  If the puppy is 7 weeks old, how do they classify it?  What if it’s 11 weeks old?  There’s very little information to go on, and the employees’ knowledge tends to pretty much conform to the card.  If you’re looking for a anything specific, good luck at the shelter.

It turns out my “hound mix” was a part Dachshund, part Labrador puppy.  A Dachsador.  She’s very cute, but I wouldn’t have picked her if I’d known she was part Dachshund.  Without meaning to disparage Dachshunds, I was looking for a bigger, more athletic, and hopefully less stubborn, dog than a Dachshund.

That said, she IS real cute.

Here’s some pictures of my little Dachsador darling:

She’s a cute little Dachsador, isn’t she?  She’s got webbed feet, like a lab, but her legs shorter than a Lab’s, while her body is longer.  At this point, she’s got a nice, athletic, low-center of gravity without being overly “Dachshundy.”  I hope she stays that way.

Even though she wasn’t what I’d set out to adopt, I loved her right away, and wasn’t about to take her back once I found out about the “weiner dog” part.

Well, read on.

The next thing I discovered was that, having lived in a cage for a good two weeks, in which this little piddle-and-poop machine was allowed out maybe twice a day if she was lucky, she was MUCH MUCH harder to housetrain than a non-shelter puppy from a backyard ever was.

If you get a puppy from a shelter, just realize that the staff have literally trained it to be at home laying around its own waste.  You will have a much more difficult time housebreaking your cute little shelter rescue.

But that isn’t the end of it, either.

In my case, I went to the Coachella Valley Animal Campus and bought myself a disease machine, as well.

The Coachella Valley Shelter has a seven day policy during which they will take some degree of responsibility for an animal’s medical condition.  After that, they will impolitely tell you, you are entirely on your own.

In the seven days you have, there is no possible way to find out that your puppy doesn’t have a potentially serious issue.  You rolls the dice and takes your chances.

First it was bordatella, aka kennel cough.  I noticed my puppy was coughing/wretching in a nasty way.  I didn’t know what it was.  Did I tell you that I’ve always obtained my puppies from backyard breeders, and that I’d never had any problems?

That wasn’t good.  But I got ten days’ worth of antibiotics, and it seemed to take care of the problem.

But read on.

Next I began to discover that my little girl had little patches of hair loss.  At first I thought it was from fleas and scratching, so I waited until after she’d had her stitches out from her spaying and gave her a flea bath.

To no avail.

I took her to the Animal Samaritan Hospital for her third multi- shot, and asked to see a vet to diagnose her.  They didn’t have any available vets, as it was “spay and neuter” day, so I got an appointment.

Then I took her next door to the Coachella Valley Animal Campus, hoping to get her seen by a veterinarian there, and was basically treated like slime for suggesting that – given the fact that the puppy they sold me had two serious diseases – they should maybe help me deal with the problem.

Did I tell you about that backyard breeder who took total responsibility of the puppies she sold?

I insisted that it was only right that a vet at least look at her, and the senior vet tech came out, and, without bothering to look at the puppy, started telling me off.  I asked her if it bothered her that she was selling diseased puppies that would literally make a lot of puppy mills look good by comparison?  She indignantly said that the puppy was NOT diseased.

REALLY, MISSES MEDICAL EXPERT?

  • ‘Kennel Cough’ is the term that was commonly applied to the most prevalent upper respiratory problem in dogs in the United States. Recently, the condition has become known as tracheobronchitis, canine infectious tracheobronchitis, Bordetellosis, or Bordetella. It is highly contagious in dogs. The disease is found worldwide and will infect a very high percentage of dogs in their lifetime.
  • Demodicosis, also known as red mange or “demodex”, is a common skin disease of dogs

Here’s a picture of what this “non-disease” can do to a dog:

Then the “senior vet tech” added insult to stupid.  She personally villified me, loudly telling me that I had been nasty since the very first day I had come in, and that she wasn’t going to deal with me any more.

The problem was that 1) I’d never seen this woman before, nor she me, so how could she know how I had acted?  And 2) I have been in that facility a total of four previous times (to pick out a pup, to take the pup home, to get the border kennel antibiotics, to have her stitches out), with either a friend or family member with me each time.  I had never been anything other than pleasant.  I’d never felt that I had any reason to be unpleasant prior to this moment.

The vet tech was trying to demagogue me, turn me into an “angry man” who had no credibility, so that others wouldn’t take what I was saying seriously.

I walked out.  I’ll never darken the door to that shelter again.

The funny thing was I went looking for a mixed breed at the county shelter because I had decided that “mixed breeds” were healthier.  But not from a government animal shelter, they aren’t.

Here’s the bottom line: think twice before you get a dog from a shelter, especially if it’s a puppy.  People love the “politically-correct” aspect of an animal shelter, and how they “rescued” a dog or cat.

If you’re about rescuing a dog or cat, and don’t care how much it will cost you in vet bills, how much suffering your pet may have to endure due to diseases, or how much destruction will likely happen to your carpet before you finally have housetraining under control, then by all means, get your dog from a shelter.  Just do it with your eyes wide open.

Don’t think I’m mocking people who do the above.  I am familiar with people who actually deliberately seek out dogs with serious health issues.  They love dogs, and are willing to go to the wall for animals no one else would want.

On the other hand, if you just want a good, healthy pet, with the least amount of potential horror story to await you, then start looking around the backyards.

Animal shelters are trying to do the right thing.  I wouldn’t argue that.  But you should read Andersonville, just as one example, so you can see that good intentions can literally pave the road to hell.  In the case of Andersonville (or the Union equivalent at Elmira, New York), there were too many inmates and too few resources.  And horror resulted.

At some point, even people who want to do the right thing become part of the disease and horror that they take part in.  This vet tech refused to look at that; so she lashed out at me as “the enemy” instead.  Even though all I wanted was a little help taking care of an animal who had had two serious diseases inflicted on her as a result of the shelter’s kennels.

When I was in the outer kennels of the Coachella Valley Animal Campus, I saw that a good 2/3rds of the dogs were lying in their own feces, their own urine, or in too many cases, both.  There are WAY too many dogs there for the staff to even begin to adequately take care of.

I should have known then what I might be getting myself into.

The Campus is a beautiful facility.  But somebody spent all the money on the appearance of the facility, rather than budgeting for the cost of actually caring for the animals.

This mange might clear up, but from what I’m told, there is a very real possibility that it will be a long-term, very persistent, very expensive condition.

I just wanted a good, healthy dog.

I could take this puppy back to the shelter and say, “YOU deal with her.”  It would satisfy my sense of poetic justice – particularly if I was able to hand her to that vile vet tech.  But that’s just not the way I roll.  I took responsibility for this animal, even if I got screwed by a dirty, disease-ridden, bureaucratic-ridden den of incompetence.

Say what you want about how anti-pc I am, but I will NEVER get a dog from an animal shelter again.  And I strongly advise you that caveat emptor applies more at your government animal shelter than it does your used car lot.